refrigerators

GE Profile PFSS2MJYSS Review

Though it’s wearing a premium badge, the GE Profile PFSS2MJYSS is in many respects an average appliance.

August 07, 2012
Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

Introduction

Though it's wearing a premium badge, the GE Profile PFSS2MJYSS is in many respects an average appliance. It has decent storage space, slightly better-than-normal energy efficiency, and adequate temperature consistency over both time and space. Overall, however, the fridge disappoints: It looks sleek and modern on the outside and has very accessible controls, but inside the freezer you're stuck with wire drawers and a poorly positioned ice maker.

But the worst offender may be the price. For the GE's MSRP of $2,299, you can find models with either substantially sleeker appearances, or cheaper models with equal performance. We did manage to find sale prices as low as $1,786, however, which makes this otherwise average appliance a bit more attractive.

Design & Usability

The thick white plastic trim and wire freezer shelves keep this fridge from feeling like a truly high-end appliance.

Like all French door models, this stainless steel appliance has two doors on top that open from the middle and reveal the interior of the fridge compartment. Below that is the drawer-like freezer, accessed by pulling out the large rectangular door. Like all stainless steel appliances, the GE Profile is prone to smudging and fingerprints.

The handles are also stainless, but are finished with a vertical grain that doesn't smudge as easily as the doors. The freezer handle curves down at both ends, giving the fridge a rather smug or disapproving appearance, depending on your imagination.

While many French door fridges combine the ice and water dispenser into one unit, this GE Profile does not. Tweet It

While many French door fridges combine the ice and water dispenser into one unit, this GE Profile does not. The external dispenser is for water only, and its inexpensive plastic exterior looks somewhat out of place.

The inside of this appliance has a clean, utilitarian appearance. There are four half-width shelves that mount on hooks in the rear, as well as a full-width fixed shelf on the bottom. A deli drawer is mounted to the bottom of a half shelf, and two vegetable drawers with independent humidity controls mirror each other further below.

On the doors are self-contained bucket shelves. The door on the right is identical to the one on the left, with one exception: Instead of having two larger shelves, one is replaced by a dairy bin located at the top. This model comes with two small plastic dividers that can be attached to any of the five standard door shelves. Since there's no through-the-door ice, there's no icemaker interrupting the fridge.

It looks as sturdy on the inside as it does on the outside. Tweet It

The pull-out freezer uses plastic wire shelves and is divided into four sections. Attached to the door is a large wire drawer that will hold the bulk of your frozen foods. Right above that is a short, full-width drawer labeled the “Slide N’ Store”, suitable for flat items like frozen pizzas and microwavable dinners. The top right is home to the “Full Slide Out” storage bin, a half-width wire drawer that can house all but the widest items. To its left is the ice maker, which has a cover that leaves a small amount of space available for tiny items such as pints of ice cream or ice packs.

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Features

A traditional design makes for a fairly easy-to-use appliance, though the ice maker is poorly positioned.

There is nothing terribly special about this French door fridge. Most of the shelves are reasonably accessible, and the freezer should pose no problem except to consumers with bad backs or limited mobility issues. The only thing that’s a pain to reach is the power switch on the ice maker, which is buried far in the back of the freezer.

One nifty extra function is called Turbo Cool, which puts the fridge into a state of fast chill. Tweet It

The front control panel runs the water dispenser, fridge, and freezer. Those buttons are clearly labeled and quite responsive. One nifty extra function is called Turbo Cool, which puts the fridge into a state of fast chill. The manual states this is ideal for refrigerating warm food or restoring your ideal temperature quickly after a power outage has ended.

While the cheap-looking water dispenser itself has no issues doing what it’s supposed to, the paddle can be a bit frustrating if you’re not paying attention. It hardly depresses at all, which means you’re more likely to accidentally turn it on (unless you activate the control lock). The filter, pleasantly enough, is quite easy to change and fairly simple to get to as long as you don’t have piles of food in front of it.

The ice maker is a self-contained unit that is controlled by flipping a switch on the device itself. Ice is stored in a pull-out bin set underneath the actual ice maker. It’s rather small, meaning you have more room for actual food but may have to wait for ice if you have a party. Also, there’s no ice dispenser on the front of the fridge, so you’ll have to stoop and scoop if you want a cold beverage.

Performance

Excellent moisture retention is enough to draw attention to this fridge, despite some less-than-perfect temperature consistency.

Despite having a wide open fridge where air can circulate freely, the temperature consistency from top to bottom wasn’t as good as we’d hoped. Luckily, temperatures remained very consistent over time, fluctuating less than a quarter of a degree on average.

If you like to buy lots of fruits and vegetables on sale and eat them during the week, they may be almost as juicy or crispy as the day you bought them. Tweet It

The freezer had similar problems to those found in the fridge, specifically a minor gap in temperature from top to bottom. You’d think that air flow between the open wire shelves would keep things more consistent, but we pack it full of frozen items—just like you do! Temperatures here were also quite consistent, fluctuating from about half to one-quarter of a degree over time. That’s a small enough difference that your food should be quite safe from freezer burn.

Moisture retention in the GE Profile’s vegetable drawer was exceptional. If you like to buy lots of fruits and vegetables on sale and eat them during the week, they may be almost as juicy or crispy as the day you bought them.

The GE Profile PFSS2MJYSS will cost a consumer about $50.31 per year to operate. This may seem like a lot, and it's true that this machine isn’t cheap to operate. However, compared to many French door fridges of its size, this is actually a reasonable amount to pay.

Conclusion

The moisture retention in the vegetable drawer was great, but that's the only remarkable thing about this GE.

It's easy to rag on a bad fridge or praise a great one, but it's difficult to capture the essence of a truly average appliance. The GE Profile PFSS2MJYSS is so middle-of-the-road that it could very easily disappear from appliance retailers without anyone noticing.

The main issue is its $2,299 MSRP. For a price tag that high, there are some above-average fridges out there more worth your consideration. But if you can find it on sale—and we did, with prices as low as $1,786—it may be worth a closer look.

Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
Advertisement - Continue Reading Below
Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

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