refrigerators
Expert Score
7.5

Review: Hisense RF20N6ASE Refrigerator

Hisense's first U.S.-bound fridge costs just $1,099. Will American buyers bite?

Credit: Reviewed.com / Matthew Zahnzinger
October 20, 2016

Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

The Cold Hard Facts

Since the RF20N6ASE (MSRP $1,099) is the first Hisense large appliance being sold in the United States, we wanted to give it the full scientific treatment. After a week in our labs, we've come to the conclusions that—at least from a data-driven standpoint—it's actually pretty darn good.

Temperature Performance

There's no question: This Hisense nails fresh food preservation. Our sensors recorded average fridge temperatures of 36.72°F at the top, 37°F exactly in the center, and 38.05°F down by the crisper. Throw in an average fluctuation of just ±0.13°F over time, and you've got truly amazing performance.

Hisense RF20N6ASE Controls
Credit: Reviewed.com / Matthew Zahnzinger
The controls look fine, but it's hit or miss if they'll register your press. View Larger

The freezer was almost as good. Deviation over time was similarly positive at just ±0.1°F. However, it ran a bit warm: We had it set to 0°F, but our sensors recorded average temperatures of 2.65°F and 3.67°F at the top and bottom, respectively. Turn the freezer down about three degrees for optimal performance. Additionally, it took 1 hour and 31 minutes for our sensors to go from room temperature to 32°F—solidly average.

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Moisture Retention

On the flip side of things are the Hisense's two crisper drawers. Over the course of three days, our test materials lost an average of 0.26 grams of moisture per hour. That's definitely on the worse end of the spectrum, and not a great sign for salad lovers.

Hisense RF20N6ASE Drawers
Credit: Reviewed.com / Matthew Zahnzinger
All the drawers in this fridge look fine, but had a habit of swiveling off track when we went to shut them. View Larger

Storage Space & Energy Efficiency

As with every counter depth fridge, there's not a ton of space inside this Hisense. However, it uses what it has well: The upper section offers 11.48 usable cubic feet of space, while the three freezer drawers serve up 4.03 usable cubic feet. That second measurement was calculated without the ice bin; if you want to use it, keep in mind that it does take up a fair amount of space.

Since there's no ice or water dispenser on this model, we weren't surprised that it used minimal amounts of energy. We were surprised, however, that it only need 0.05 kWh to cool each usable cubic foot, making this one of the most efficient fridges we've tested. At a fixed rate of $0.09 per kWh, that comes out to roughly $26.21 a year.

Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

Advertisement - Continue Reading Below

Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

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